Theodore Roosevelt National Park

5 thoughts on “Theodore Roosevelt National Park”

  1. I now want to see nature’s cannonballs! You took so lovely pictures of the park. I have not yet made it to North Dakota and now I have an idea of where to go when we visit.

    Like

  2. It sounds like we have similar tastes. I love exploring small towns and I’m definitely not a fan of crowded campgrounds. I’ve actually never heard of this park but I’ll add it to my list because I’m a sucker for unusual rocks and rock formations. Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. I think there are a good number of us that enjoy small towns and quiet campgrounds. Although, I was once the guy with five noisy kids that stayed up late at night. My how things have changed.

      Like

  3. So, now I will add the town of Medora and Theordore Roosevelt National Park to my bucket list. The expression on Grammi’s face at the bakery looks to be one of pure contentment and enjoyment. The town sounds so charming – even if the campground does not. The scenery in the national park looks so very beautiful. I am wondering about nature’s cannonballs. How did they form? The park does sound very appealing – the wildlife, raw beauty, quiet solitude in a vast expanse. We just spent some time in Estes Park. It was so crowded. We didn’t have the reservations for Rocky Mountain NP (been there twice before), but the crowds made me wonder if we shouldn’t consider other options – like less visited NP or state parks. In any case, I enjoyed reading your post, especially the part about the destination being more than the campground. Your descriptions endear the locales to me and inspire me to seek out adventure. Safe travels, and enjoy your day!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Medora did remind me of a smaller less crowded version of Estes Park. We were there a few years ago.

      There was a sign posted explaining the cannonballs. I took a picture but didn’t included it because it had a glare and was of poor quality. Basically it said they form naturally when water seeps through porous mineral deposits. They say they come in all shapes but can’t say for sure why some are round. When the bluff erodes, the round ones roll down and accumulate at the bottom. Thanks for your comments, I do enjoy reading them—happy days and safe travels.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s